Introduction to Globalisation and Learning (ED187)

 

Syllabus

Introduction to Globalisation and Learning (ED187)

Short Description

Lecture, two hours; TA sessions, two hours.

Introduction to different conceptualizations of globalisation and their relationship to educational processes and learning in contemporary societies. Several concepts and theoretical lenses are discussed as a basis for approaching and understanding how the dialectics of the global and local are affecting educational systems and learning over the lifespan.

Format and Time

The course will be offered in a lecture format with discussion sessions in smaller groups led by teaching assistants.

Lecture session

Fall 2016: Tuesdays 1:00pm – 2:50pm

TA session

Fall 2016:  Thursdays 9am – 10:50pm

Instructors

Richard DESJARDINS Associate Professor 3119 Moore Hall

Email:       dezride@live.com                       Office Hours:  By appointment

Jonathan BANFILL Teaching Assistant

Email: jonathanbanfill@ucla.edu

Office Hours:  Last 15 minutes of section and by appointment

Course Design

This course introduces different conceptualizations of globalisation and their relationship to educational processes and learning in contemporary societies. Several concepts and theoretical lenses are introduced as a basis for approaching and understanding how the dialectics of the global and the local are affecting educational systems and learning over the lifespan. An underlying theme throughout the course is Global Citizenship Education which is the focus of the second and third courses of a concentration on Globalisation and Learning at the undergraduate level.

The course is organized into two major parts. The first part focuses on the contemporary setting for educational systems in the context of the dialectics of the global and the local. The major topics covered are as follows:

  1. Forces that affect educational systems
  2. Globalisation and the knowledge society
  3. Globalisation and risk
  4. Globalisation and social disadvantage
  5. Globalisation and democracy
  6. Globalisation and citizenship

The second part focuses on reform dynamics in educational systems with emphasis on the following major topics:

  1. Globalisation and the lifelong learning paradigm
  2. Globalisation and K-12 educational reform
  3. Globalisation and higher education reform

Course Goals

The aims of the course are to enable students to:

  1. Understand critically the different processes that can be signified by the term globalisation and their implications on well
  2. Demonstrate insight into the forces that affect educational systems in the context of the dialectics of the global and the
  3. Assess the significance of globalisation processes in shaping the contemporary setting for educational
  4. Synthesize and apply analytically key concepts that are emerging from the wider social sciences and relevant to

Assignments and Activities

Readings

A reader will be made available which includes most of the readings to be assigned. Readings are derived from various sources. Instructors may disseminate additional readings and materials throughout the course as needed to cover the topics.

Participation in TA sessions

Students are expected to complete readings before lectures and TA sessions and be prepared to engage in discussion on issues related to the assigned readings and the topic more generally. Active participation in TA sessions is essential and attendance of a minimum of 80 percent is required.

Project 1 – Review

The preparation of a substantive review (1,500-2,500 words) of a scholarly book, article or policy report. Books, articles or reports [referred to as a “reference”] should be related to a theme that is to be covered in the course but should not be taken from the required reading list. Write ups should be  submitted directly to the teaching assistants as per their instruction. The deadline for submitting the Project 1 paper is November 10th in TA section (paper copy) and online (pdf).

Participation in group work related to Project 1 and submission of brief summary

The second half of TA sessions 3, 4, 5 and 6 will be dedicated to group work relating to Project 1 (approx. 45 minutes per TA session). Students must sign-up in TA session 1 to present in a specific session.

The group work will be organized as follows. In TA session 1, five groups of eight students will be formed. Within each of the five groups, two students will sign-up to present in a given TA session (i.e. TA session 3, 4, 5 or 6). Thus each student will have approx. 22 minutes to present.

Students are to present their work in progress in relation to Project 1 for approximately 10 minutes and then lead a discussion around the topic for about 12 minutes. The “reference” chosen for review as part of Project 1 should relate to one of themes of the corresponding lectures, but should not be taken from the required reading list.

No powerpoint projection will be available (since there will be five groups operating simultaneously in the same class) but if students wish to share a small laptop screen to view slides, graphs, pictures or internet sites, they may do so if they wish. Otherwise, a verbal presentation and discussion without any audio visual aids is also fine.

Each student is expected to hand in to the TA (on the day of their presentation) a short summary of the “reference” they chose to present which should include:

  1. The citation of the reference in APA
  2. A 500-word abstract of the reference (using own words).
  3. A one-page summary of brief presentation notes in point
  4. A one-half page of discussion
  5. Signatures of students who attended presentation

Students are to continue working on their Project 1 and submit their substantive review (1,500-2,500 words) following a procedure agreed with the TA (paper and digital copy) and no later than November 10.

Project 2 – Research Paper

The preparation of a research paper (4,000-4,500 words) on a topic relevant to the course. Write ups should be submitted directly to one of the teaching assistants as per their instruction. The deadline for submitting the Project 2 paper online is Friday of exam week, December 9th, no later than 5pm.

Participation in group work related to Project 2 and submission of brief summary

The second half of TA sessions 7, 8 and 9 will be dedicated to group work relating to Project 2. In the same manner as for Project 1, students must sign-up in TA session 1 to present in a specific session.

Groups will remain the same as in Project 1 and will be organized as follows. Within each of the five groups, three students will sign-up to present in a given TA session (i.e. TA session 7, 8 or 9). Thus each student will have approx. 15 minutes to present.

Students are to present their work in progress in relation to Project 2 for approximately 7 minutes and then engage in a brief discussion with students within their smaller group to obtain feedback on the approach to their topic for another 8 minutes.

Each student is expected to hand in to the TA (on the day of their presentation) a short summary of their intended topic for Project 2 which should include:

  1. A one-page abstract of the intended research
  2. A one-page annotated bibliography of three references to be used in the One of the references may be the same that is to be used in Project 1.

Students are to continue working on their Project 2 and submit their research paper (4,000-4,500 words) following a procedure agreed with the TA and no later than the Friday of exam week (December 9th).

Grading

A letter grade will be awarded on the following basis:

  1. Readings/participation in TA discussion sessions: 10 points
  2. Participation in group work related to Project 1 and submission of brief summary: 10 points
  3. Participation in group work related to Project 2 and submission of brief summary: 10 points
  4. Project 1 paper: 30 points
  5. Project 2 paper: 40 points

Note:

98-100 points = A+

94-97 points = A

90-93 points = A-

86-89 points= B+

82-85 points= B

78-81 points= B-

74-77 points= C

70-73 points= C-

66-69 points= D+

62-65 points= D

below 62 points= Fail

Policy on Late Assignments

Project 1 assignments are due November 10th. Late assignments may be submitted up to and including the end of exam week but with reduced credit (-1 point on final grade per a business day and reduced comments).

Project 2 assignments must be submitted by the end of exam week (no exceptions for students without an excusable and documented reason).

Scheduled presentations must proceed on day in which they are scheduled and brief summaries must be submitted to TA on day of presentation (no exceptions for students without an excusable and documented reason).

Other Course Policies and Expectations

  1. Please mute your sound emitting devices during class and
  2. Please refrain from recording class
  3. Assignments must follow the APA style Specifically, citations and references must follow the APA style guide. For reference please consult https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/, or comparable source (Note: TA will go over some basics of APA style in TA session 2).
  4. You are assumed to be familiar with the university’s policies on cheating and plagiarism and the potential penalties involved (http://www.deanofstudents.ucla.edu/portals/16/documents/UCLA%20Student%20Conduct%2 0Code%209-29-14%20final.pdf)

Support and Resources for Students

Students with Disabilities

Students needing academic accommodations based on a disability should contact the Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD) at (310)825-1501 or in person at Murphy Hall A255. When possible, students should contact the OSD within the first two weeks of the term as reasonable notice is needed to coordinate accommodations. For more information visit www.osd.ucla.edu.

The Undergraduate Writing Center

The Undergraduate Writing Center offers UCLA undergraduates one-on-one sessions on their writing. The Center is staffed by peer learning facilitators (PLFs), undergraduates who are trained to help at any stage in the writing process and with writing assignments from across the curriculum. PLFs tailor appointments to the concerns of each writer. Sessions can focus on how to approach an assignment, on formulating a thesis, on fleshing out a plan/outline for a draft, on reading a draft with the writer to check for clarity and flow, on incorporating and citing sources, on revising a paper based on instructor feedback, or on tackling grammar or sentence structure problems. (http://wp.ucla.edu/wc/).

List of Required Readings

A reader containing all of the following required readings can be purchased from the UCLA bookstore. While readers can be convenient, unfortunately most references to in-text citations are not practical or possible to include in a reader of this kind. It will thus be necessary to consult the complete sources if you require further information on specific references.

  1. LAUDER, H., BROWN, P., DILLABOUGH, J., & HALSEY, A.H. (2006). Introduction: The prospects for education: Individualization, Globalization, and Social Change. In: H. LAUDER, P. BROWN, J. DILLABOUGH, & A.H. HALSEY (eds), Education, Globalization & Social Change (p. 1-70). Oxford: Oxford University Press. [63 pages]
  1. BROWN, P. (2001). Globalization and the political economy of high skills. In: P. BROWN, A. GREEN, & H. LAUDER, High Skills: Globalization, Competitive, and Skills Formation (p. 235-262). Oxford: Oxford University Press. [27 pages]
  1. GIDDENS, A. (1991). Modernity and Self-Identity (Introduction, p. 1-9). Stanford: Stanford University Press. [9 pages]
  1. DESJARDINS, R. (2013). Considerations of the impact of neoliberalism and alternative regimes on learning and its outcomes: With an empirical example based on the level and distribution of adult learning, International Studies in Sociology of Education, 23(2), pp. 182-203. [20 pages]
  1. PIKETTY, T. (2014) Capital in the Twenty-first Century (Introduction, p. 1-35). Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. [35 pages]
  1. SEN, A. (2009) The Idea of Justice (Introduction, p. 1-27). Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. [27 pages]
  1. INGLEHART, R., & WELZEL, C. (2010) Changing mass priorities: the link between modernization and democracy, Perspectives on Politics, 8(2), pp. 551-567. [11 pages]
  1. TORRES, C.A. (2015). Global citizenship and global universities. The age of global interdependence and cosmopolitanism, European Journal of Education, 50(3), pp. 262-289. [20 pages]
  1. RUBENSON, K. (2006). Constructing the lifelong learning paradigm: Competing vision from the OECD and UNESCO. In S. EHLERS (ed.), Milestones Towards Lifelong Learning Systems (p. 151-170). Copenhagen: Danish University of Education Press. [19 pages]
  1. CARNOY, M. (1999). Globalization and Educational Reform: What Planners Need to Know (Chapter III, p. 37-46 and Chapter V, p. 61-75). Paris: UNESCO-IIEP. [20 pages]
  1. POPKEWITZ, T.S. (1991). A Politicial Sociology of Educational Reform (Chapter 1, p. 13-44). New York: Teachers College Press. [30 pages]
  1. GIROUX, H. (2014). Neoliberalism’s War on Higher Education (Introduction, p. 1-28). Chicago: Haymarket Books. [28 pages]

Lecture Plan

Lecture 1 – Introduction and Overview

 Date: Tuesday 09.27.2016

Overview of themes

  1. The forces of social change and the impact of globalisation
  2. The rising significance of education
  3. Social policy, education and deliberate social change

Assigned Readings

LAUDER, H., BROWN, P., DILLABOUGH, J., & HALSEY, A.H. (2006). Introduction: The prospects for education: Individualization, Globalization, and Social Change. In: H. LAUDER, P. BROWN, J. DILLABOUGH, & A.H. HALSEY (eds), Education, Globalization & Social Change (p. 1-63). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Part I. The new setting for educational systems

Lecture 2 – Globalisation and the Knowledge Economy/Society

Date: Tuesday 10.11.2016

Overview of themes

  1. The global knowledge economy
  2. Modernity, post-structuralism and the knowledge society

Assigned Readings

BROWN, P. (2001). Globalization and the political economy of high skills. In: P. BROWN, A. GREEN, & H. LAUDER,

High Skills: Globalization, Competitive, and Skills Formation (p. 235-262). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

GIDDENS, A. (1991). Modernity and Self-Identity (Introduction, p. 1-9). Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Lecture 3 – Globalisation and Risk

Date: Tuesday 10.18.2016

Overview of themes

  1. Problems of the commons and other coordination problems
  2. Risk society
  3. Critical pedagogy

Assigned Readings

DESJARDINS, R. (2013). Considerations of the impact of neoliberalism and alternative regimes on learning and its outcomes: With an empirical example based on the level and distribution of adult learning, International Studies in Sociology of Education, 23(2), pp.182-203.

 

Lecture 4 – Globalisation and Social Disadvantage

 Date: Tuesday 10.25.2016

Overview of themes

  1. Structural inequality and social disadvantage
  2. Ideas of Justice
  3. Freedoms, functionings and capabilities

Assigned Readings

PIKETTY, T. (2014) Capital in the Twenty-first Century (Introduction, p. 1-35). Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.

SEN, A. (2009) The Idea of Justice (Introduction, p. 1-27). Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.

Lecture 5 – Globalisation and Democracy

 Date: Tuesday 11.01.2016

Overview of themes

  1. The modernization hypothesis and social reproduction
  2. Education for social transformation

Assigned Readings

INGLEHART, R., & WELZEL, C. (2010) Changing mass priorities: the link between modernization and democracy,

Perspectives on Politics, 8(2), pp. 551-567. Lecture 6 – Globalisation and Citizenship Date: Tuesday 11.08.2016

Overview of themes

  1. Types of citizenship
  2. State, market and stakeholder forms of governance

Assigned Readings

TORRES, C.A. (2015). Global citizenship and global universities. The age of global interdependence and cosmopolitanism, European Journal of Education, 50(3), pp. 262-289.

Part II. Reform dynamics in educational systems Lecture 7 – Globalisation and Lifelong Learning Date: Tuesday 11.15.2016

Overview of themes

  1. Global policy concepts in education reform
  2. Lifelong learning concepts and models
  3. Lifelong learning as a complement and substitute to education

Assigned Readings

RUBENSON, K. (2006). Constructing the lifelong learning paradigm: Competing vision from the OECD and UNESCO. In S. EHLERS (ed.), Milestones Towards Lifelong Learning Systems (p. 151-170). Copenhagen: Danish University of Education Press.

Lecture 8 – Globalisation and K-12 Educational Reform

Date: Tuesday 11.22.2016

Overview of themes

  1. New public management in education
  2. The measurement industry in education
  3. No Child Left Behind Act

Assigned Readings

CARNOY, M. (1999). Globalization and Educational Reform: What Planners Need to Know (Chapter III, p. 37-46 and Chapter V, p. 61-75). Paris: UNESCO-IIEP.

POPKEWITZ, T.S. (1991). A Politicial Sociology of Educational Reform (Chapter 1, p. 13-44). New York: Teachers College Press.

Lecture 9 – Globalisation and Higher Education Reform

Date: Tuesday 11.29.2016

Overview of themes

  1. Knowledge and power in educational reform
  2. Importance of comparative studies as tools to study institutional variation
  3. Critical analysis

Assigned Readings

GIROUX, H. (2014). Neoliberalism’s War on Higher Education (Introduction, p. 1-28). Chicago: Haymarket Books.

 

TA Session Plan

TA Session 1 – Introduction and Overview

Date: Thursday 09.29.2016

Part 1 – Discussion

Discussion and activities to be led by TA and all students are expected to participate.

Part 2 – Group work

Group work for Projects 1 and 2 to be organized.

TA Session 2 – Extended Discussion of Assignments

 Date: Thursday 10.6.2016

Part 1 – APA Style and Analytical Review Example

Discussion of APA style and how to write a substantive analytical review (Project 1)

Part 2 – Additional Housekeeping and Office Hours Required for any new students enrolled in the course

TA Session 3 – Globalisation and the Knowledge Economy/Society

 Date: Thursday 10.13.2016

Part 1 – Discussion

Discussion and activities to be led by TA and all students are expected to participate.

Part 2 – Group work

Two students within each of five groups will present their work in relation to Project 1 and lead discussion for 20 minutes.

TA Session 4 – Globalisation and Risk 

Date: Thursday 10.20.2016

Part 1 – Discussion

Discussion and activities to be led by TA and all students are expected to participate.

Part 2 – Group work

Two students within each of five groups will present their work in relation to Project 1 and lead discussion for 20 minutes.

TA Session 5 – Globalisation and Social Disadvantage

Date: Thursday 10.27.2016

Part 1 – Discussion

Discussion and activities to be led by TA and all students are expected to participate.

Part 2 – Group work

Two students within each of five groups will present their work in relation to Project 1 and lead discussion for 20 minutes.

TA Session 6 – Globalisation and Democracy

Date: Thursday 11.03.2016

Part 1 – Discussion

Discussion and activities to be led by TA and all students are expected to participate.

Part 2 – Group work

Two students within each of five groups will present their work in relation to Project 1 and lead discussion for 20 minutes.

TA Session 7 – Globalisation and Citizenship 

Date: Thursday 11.10.2016

NOTE: Project 1 due in section (paper copy), and submit digital copy online

Part 1 – Discussion

Discussion and activities to be led by TA and all students are expected to participate.

Part 2 – Group work

Three students within each of five groups will present their work in relation to Project 2 and lead discussion for 15 minutes.

TA Session 8 – Globalisation and Lifelong Learning

Date: Thursday 11.17.2016

Part 1 – Discussion

Discussion and activities to be led by TA and all students are expected to participate.

Part 2 – Group work

Three students within each of five groups will present their work in relation to Project 2 and lead discussion for 15 minutes.

TA Session 9 – Globalisation and Educational Reform

 Date: Thursday 12.01.2016

Part 1 – Discussion

Discussion and activities to be led by TA and all students are expected to participate.

Part 2 – Group work

Three students within each of five groups will present their work in relation to Project 2 and lead discussion for 15 minutes.

NOTE: Please submit project 2 online by Friday December 9th, no later than 5pm

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