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The BGF-G7 Summit Initiative Report

Cyber Conflict and Fake News

Proposals for Consideration at G-7 Summit, Taormina, Italy, May 26-27, 2017

The Boston Global Forum herein submits policy proposals in two areas—cyber conflict and disinformation (fake news)—for consideration at the 2017 G-7 Summit in Taormina, Italy.

Contributors to this document are Nazli Choucri, Anders Corr, Michael Dukakis, Ryan Maness, Tuan Nguyen, Thomas Patterson, Derek S. Reveron, John E. Savage, and David Silbersweig.

Read the full BGF-G7 Summit Initiative Report here

Ethics Code Of Conduct For Cyber Peace And Security (ECCC) Version 3.0

THE ETHICS CODE OF CONDUCT FOR CYBER PEACE AND SECURITY (ECCC)

Version 3.0

Governor Michael Dukakis, Mr. Nguyen Anh Tuan, Mr. Allan Cytryn, Prof. Nazli Choucri, Prof. Thomas Patterson, Prof. Derek Reveron, Prof. John E. Savage, Prof. John Quelch, Prof. Carlos Torres.

The Boston Global Forum’s Ethics Code of Conduct for Cyber Peace and Security (ECCC) makes the following recommendations for maintaining the security, stability and integrity of cyberspace.

Net Citizens Should

• Engage in responsible behavior on the Internet, e.g.

o Conduct oneself online with the same thoughtfulness, consideration and respect for others that you expect from them, both online and offline

o Do not visit suspicious websites

o Do not share news or content from sources that are not trustworthy

• Learn and apply security best practices, e.g.

o Update software when notified by vendors.

o Ensure your PC has virus protection software installed and running.

o Use strong passwords, change them periodically, and do not share them.

o Do not transmit personally identifiable information to unknown sites.

o Maintain a healthy suspicion of email from unknown sources.

o For web communication use HTTPS instead of HTTP when possible.

Policy Makers Should

• Endorse and implement recommendations made by the 2015 UN Group of (G20). Below we summarize the important norms concerning information and communication technologies (ICTs).

1. [GGE] International law, including the UN Charter, applies online.

2. [GGE] States should help limit harmful uses of ICTs, especially those that threaten international peace and security.

3. [GGE] States should recognize that good attribution in cyberspace is difficult to obtain, which means miscalculation in response to cyber incidents is possible.

4. [GGE] States should not knowingly allow their territory to be used for malicious ICT activity.

5. [GGE] States should assist other states victimized by an ICT attack.

6. [GGE] States, in managing ICT activities, should respect the Human Rights Council and UN General Assembly resolutions on privacy and freedom of expression.

7. [GGE] States should protect their critical infrastructure from ICT threats.

8. [GGE] A state should not conduct or permit ICT use that damages the critical infrastructure of another state or impairs its operations.

9. [GGE] States should work to ensure the integrity of the supply chain so as to maintain confidence in the security of ICT products.

10. [GGE] States should prevent the proliferation of malicious ICT tools and techniques and the use of harmful hidden functions.

11. [GGE] States should encourage reporting of ICT vulnerabilities and the sharing of remedies for them.

12. [GGE] States should not knowingly attempt to harm the operations of a computer emergency  response team. Nor should it use such a team for malicious international activity.

13. [G7] No state should conduct or support ICT-enabled theft of intellectual property, trade secrets or other confidential business information for commercial gain.

14. [G7] If ICT activity amounts to the use of force (an armed attack), states can invoke Article 51 of the UN Charter in response.

15. [G7] States should collaborate on research and development on security, privacy and resilience.

16. [G7] States are encouraged to join the Budapest Convention.

• States should not create nor tolerate the dissemination of fake news.

IT Engineers Should

• Apply best practices in the design, implementation and testing of hardware and software products so as to

o Avoid ICT vulnerabilities,

o Protect user privacy and data

• Make use of the NIST “Framework for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity” as a guide for improving the security of critical applications.

• Should not create nor use technology to create or disseminate fake news.

Business Firms and Business Leaders Should

• Take responsibility for handling sensitive corporate data stored electronically.

• Create employment criteria to ensure that employees are qualified to design and implement products and services that meet high security standards.

• Ensure that IT engineers are kept abreast of the latest ICT security threats.

• Implement effective Cyber Resilience in your business.

• Engage in information sharing of ICT hazards, subject to reasonable safeguards, with other companies in similar businesses.

Educators, Influencers/Institutions Should

• Teach the responsibilities of net citizens described above, including fostering good behavior and avoidance of malicious activity.

• Help global citizens to acquire the critical thinking skills needed to identify and avoid fake news and discourage its dissemination.

• Ensure that IT engineers are taught the skills necessary to produce safe, reliable and secure ICT products and services.

• Educate and lead global citizens to support and implement the ECCC.

• Create honors and awards to recognize outstanding individuals who contribute greatly to a secure and safe cyberspace.

Download Ethics Code of Conduct for Cyber Peace and Security (ECCC) here

Fake News and Preventing Cyberwar are featured discussions at The Boston Global Forum Summit on Tuesday April 25

The emergence of Fake News and threat of Cyberwar now impact

free, fair and peaceful elections in the US and elswehere

Cambridge Mass (April 20, 2017) — Leading cybersecurity and international media authorities will discuss coping with the rising impact of fake news and peaceful solutions to the threat of cyberwar at the upcoming Boston Global Forum-G7 Summit Initiative Conference in Cambridge.

8:30-11:30 AM, Tuesday, April 25

The Harvard University Faculty Club

20 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA

Opening remarks will be delivered by: Gov. Michael Dukakis, Chairman, Boston Global Forum, followed by Nicola De Santis, Consul General of Italy in Boston

Media Coverage is invited:

For Press Credentials Contact: Dick Pirozzolo + 1 617 959 4613, dick@pirozzolo.com or Tuan Nguyen + 1 617 286 6589, tuan_nguyen@bostonglobalforum.org

CYBERWAR

The first Initiative of the BGF-G7 Summit Initiative on Preventing Cyberwar as Toarmina Solutions will be delivered by Prof. John Savage, Brown University; Mikko Hypponen – Chief Research Officer, F-Secure, and Trey Herr – Cybersecurity Fellow, Harvard Kennedy School.

Their presentation will be followed with a panel discussion by Prof. Derek Reveron and Prof. Thomas E. Creely, Naval War College; Prof. Nazli Choucri, MIT; Ryan Maness, Northeastern University; and Anders Corr, Principal, Corr Analytics.

FAKE NEWS

Coping with the spread of fake news will be addressed by Global Citizenship Education Network Professor Thomas Patterson of Harvard University; Anders Corr of Corr Analytics, and with Nguyen Anh Tuan, cofounder and CEO of The Boston Global Forum and chair of the International Advisory Committee of UNESCO in Global Learning and Global Citizenship Education at UCLA. This is the second Initiative of the BGF-G7 Summit Initiative.

Their comments will be followed by a panel discussion on the recent emergence of fake news and its impact on the democratic process with Prof. Carlos Alberto Torres, UCLA; Llewellyn King, Host, Whitehouse Chronicle and Barry Nolan, Senior Advisor, Joint Economic Committee, US Congress.

For observations on Cyberwar and Fake News visit: THE BGF-G7 SUMMIT INITIATIVE

“Escape from Saigon – a Novel”

Following the official BGF program, Dick Pirozzolo, Boston Global Forum Editorial Board Member, will deliver an informal talk and reading from: “Escape from Saigon,” a new novel set during, April of 1975—the final 30 days of the Vietnam War, coauthored with Michael Morris (Skyhorse Publishing, New York, Jan. 2017).

About The Boston Global Forum

Established in 2012, The Boston Global Forum brings together, in an open and accessible public forum, an eclectic and engaging spectrum of highly regarded academic leaders, real-world experts, influential thoughts leaders, media experts and promising young leaders.

BGF’s immediate goal is to identify emerging threats to peace and stability around the globe, suggest realistic solutions, and identify possible actions that can be taken to avert armed conflict. The Forum’s ultimate goal is to lessen tensions, promote peace and security, and foster conditions that lead to greater social justice and broader economic prosperity wherever they are most needed.

First Global Commons Review Presented at 2017 UNESCO Conference

The UNESCO-UCLA Chair in Global Learning and Global Citizenship Education, Dr. Carlos Alberto Torres, unveiled the first issue of the Global Commons Review (GCR) at the UNESCO Week for Peace and Sustainable Development: The Role of Education, on March 6, 2017 in Ottawa, Canada.

The first issue features articles written by highly-respected professors and scholars from various well-known universities across the globe. Issue Number Zero brings readers a general introduction to the Global Citizenship Education (GCE) program and the Global Citizenship Education Network (GCEN), which set the foundation for further issues of the Global Commons Review.

Dr. Carlos Alberto Torres gift UNESCO Director-general Irina Bokova Issue number Zero

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Introduction to Globalisation and Learning (ED187)

 

Syllabus

Introduction to Globalisation and Learning (ED187)

Short Description

Lecture, two hours; TA sessions, two hours.

Introduction to different conceptualizations of globalisation and their relationship to educational processes and learning in contemporary societies. Several concepts and theoretical lenses are discussed as a basis for approaching and understanding how the dialectics of the global and local are affecting educational systems and learning over the lifespan.

Format and Time

The course will be offered in a lecture format with discussion sessions in smaller groups led by teaching assistants.

Lecture session

Fall 2016: Tuesdays 1:00pm – 2:50pm

TA session

Fall 2016:  Thursdays 9am – 10:50pm

Instructors

Richard DESJARDINS Associate Professor 3119 Moore Hall

Email:       dezride@live.com                       Office Hours:  By appointment

Jonathan BANFILL Teaching Assistant

Email: jonathanbanfill@ucla.edu

Office Hours:  Last 15 minutes of section and by appointment

Course Design

This course introduces different conceptualizations of globalisation and their relationship to educational processes and learning in contemporary societies. Several concepts and theoretical lenses are introduced as a basis for approaching and understanding how the dialectics of the global and the local are affecting educational systems and learning over the lifespan. An underlying theme throughout the course is Global Citizenship Education which is the focus of the second and third courses of a concentration on Globalisation and Learning at the undergraduate level.

The course is organized into two major parts. The first part focuses on the contemporary setting for educational systems in the context of the dialectics of the global and the local. The major topics covered are as follows:

  1. Forces that affect educational systems
  2. Globalisation and the knowledge society
  3. Globalisation and risk
  4. Globalisation and social disadvantage
  5. Globalisation and democracy
  6. Globalisation and citizenship

The second part focuses on reform dynamics in educational systems with emphasis on the following major topics:

  1. Globalisation and the lifelong learning paradigm
  2. Globalisation and K-12 educational reform
  3. Globalisation and higher education reform

Course Goals

The aims of the course are to enable students to:

  1. Understand critically the different processes that can be signified by the term globalisation and their implications on well
  2. Demonstrate insight into the forces that affect educational systems in the context of the dialectics of the global and the
  3. Assess the significance of globalisation processes in shaping the contemporary setting for educational
  4. Synthesize and apply analytically key concepts that are emerging from the wider social sciences and relevant to

Assignments and Activities

Readings

A reader will be made available which includes most of the readings to be assigned. Readings are derived from various sources. Instructors may disseminate additional readings and materials throughout the course as needed to cover the topics.

Participation in TA sessions

Students are expected to complete readings before lectures and TA sessions and be prepared to engage in discussion on issues related to the assigned readings and the topic more generally. Active participation in TA sessions is essential and attendance of a minimum of 80 percent is required.

Project 1 – Review

The preparation of a substantive review (1,500-2,500 words) of a scholarly book, article or policy report. Books, articles or reports [referred to as a “reference”] should be related to a theme that is to be covered in the course but should not be taken from the required reading list. Write ups should be  submitted directly to the teaching assistants as per their instruction. The deadline for submitting the Project 1 paper is November 10th in TA section (paper copy) and online (pdf).

Participation in group work related to Project 1 and submission of brief summary

The second half of TA sessions 3, 4, 5 and 6 will be dedicated to group work relating to Project 1 (approx. 45 minutes per TA session). Students must sign-up in TA session 1 to present in a specific session.

The group work will be organized as follows. In TA session 1, five groups of eight students will be formed. Within each of the five groups, two students will sign-up to present in a given TA session (i.e. TA session 3, 4, 5 or 6). Thus each student will have approx. 22 minutes to present.

Students are to present their work in progress in relation to Project 1 for approximately 10 minutes and then lead a discussion around the topic for about 12 minutes. The “reference” chosen for review as part of Project 1 should relate to one of themes of the corresponding lectures, but should not be taken from the required reading list.

No powerpoint projection will be available (since there will be five groups operating simultaneously in the same class) but if students wish to share a small laptop screen to view slides, graphs, pictures or internet sites, they may do so if they wish. Otherwise, a verbal presentation and discussion without any audio visual aids is also fine.

Each student is expected to hand in to the TA (on the day of their presentation) a short summary of the “reference” they chose to present which should include:

  1. The citation of the reference in APA
  2. A 500-word abstract of the reference (using own words).
  3. A one-page summary of brief presentation notes in point
  4. A one-half page of discussion
  5. Signatures of students who attended presentation

Students are to continue working on their Project 1 and submit their substantive review (1,500-2,500 words) following a procedure agreed with the TA (paper and digital copy) and no later than November 10.

Project 2 – Research Paper

The preparation of a research paper (4,000-4,500 words) on a topic relevant to the course. Write ups should be submitted directly to one of the teaching assistants as per their instruction. The deadline for submitting the Project 2 paper online is Friday of exam week, December 9th, no later than 5pm.

Participation in group work related to Project 2 and submission of brief summary

The second half of TA sessions 7, 8 and 9 will be dedicated to group work relating to Project 2. In the same manner as for Project 1, students must sign-up in TA session 1 to present in a specific session.

Groups will remain the same as in Project 1 and will be organized as follows. Within each of the five groups, three students will sign-up to present in a given TA session (i.e. TA session 7, 8 or 9). Thus each student will have approx. 15 minutes to present.

Students are to present their work in progress in relation to Project 2 for approximately 7 minutes and then engage in a brief discussion with students within their smaller group to obtain feedback on the approach to their topic for another 8 minutes.

Each student is expected to hand in to the TA (on the day of their presentation) a short summary of their intended topic for Project 2 which should include:

  1. A one-page abstract of the intended research
  2. A one-page annotated bibliography of three references to be used in the One of the references may be the same that is to be used in Project 1.

Students are to continue working on their Project 2 and submit their research paper (4,000-4,500 words) following a procedure agreed with the TA and no later than the Friday of exam week (December 9th).

Grading

A letter grade will be awarded on the following basis:

  1. Readings/participation in TA discussion sessions: 10 points
  2. Participation in group work related to Project 1 and submission of brief summary: 10 points
  3. Participation in group work related to Project 2 and submission of brief summary: 10 points
  4. Project 1 paper: 30 points
  5. Project 2 paper: 40 points

Note:

98-100 points = A+

94-97 points = A

90-93 points = A-

86-89 points= B+

82-85 points= B

78-81 points= B-

74-77 points= C

70-73 points= C-

66-69 points= D+

62-65 points= D

below 62 points= Fail

Policy on Late Assignments

Project 1 assignments are due November 10th. Late assignments may be submitted up to and including the end of exam week but with reduced credit (-1 point on final grade per a business day and reduced comments).

Project 2 assignments must be submitted by the end of exam week (no exceptions for students without an excusable and documented reason).

Scheduled presentations must proceed on day in which they are scheduled and brief summaries must be submitted to TA on day of presentation (no exceptions for students without an excusable and documented reason).

Other Course Policies and Expectations

  1. Please mute your sound emitting devices during class and
  2. Please refrain from recording class
  3. Assignments must follow the APA style Specifically, citations and references must follow the APA style guide. For reference please consult https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/, or comparable source (Note: TA will go over some basics of APA style in TA session 2).
  4. You are assumed to be familiar with the university’s policies on cheating and plagiarism and the potential penalties involved (http://www.deanofstudents.ucla.edu/portals/16/documents/UCLA%20Student%20Conduct%2 0Code%209-29-14%20final.pdf)

Support and Resources for Students

Students with Disabilities

Students needing academic accommodations based on a disability should contact the Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD) at (310)825-1501 or in person at Murphy Hall A255. When possible, students should contact the OSD within the first two weeks of the term as reasonable notice is needed to coordinate accommodations. For more information visit www.osd.ucla.edu.

The Undergraduate Writing Center

The Undergraduate Writing Center offers UCLA undergraduates one-on-one sessions on their writing. The Center is staffed by peer learning facilitators (PLFs), undergraduates who are trained to help at any stage in the writing process and with writing assignments from across the curriculum. PLFs tailor appointments to the concerns of each writer. Sessions can focus on how to approach an assignment, on formulating a thesis, on fleshing out a plan/outline for a draft, on reading a draft with the writer to check for clarity and flow, on incorporating and citing sources, on revising a paper based on instructor feedback, or on tackling grammar or sentence structure problems. (http://wp.ucla.edu/wc/).

List of Required Readings

A reader containing all of the following required readings can be purchased from the UCLA bookstore. While readers can be convenient, unfortunately most references to in-text citations are not practical or possible to include in a reader of this kind. It will thus be necessary to consult the complete sources if you require further information on specific references.

  1. LAUDER, H., BROWN, P., DILLABOUGH, J., & HALSEY, A.H. (2006). Introduction: The prospects for education: Individualization, Globalization, and Social Change. In: H. LAUDER, P. BROWN, J. DILLABOUGH, & A.H. HALSEY (eds), Education, Globalization & Social Change (p. 1-70). Oxford: Oxford University Press. [63 pages]
  1. BROWN, P. (2001). Globalization and the political economy of high skills. In: P. BROWN, A. GREEN, & H. LAUDER, High Skills: Globalization, Competitive, and Skills Formation (p. 235-262). Oxford: Oxford University Press. [27 pages]
  1. GIDDENS, A. (1991). Modernity and Self-Identity (Introduction, p. 1-9). Stanford: Stanford University Press. [9 pages]
  1. DESJARDINS, R. (2013). Considerations of the impact of neoliberalism and alternative regimes on learning and its outcomes: With an empirical example based on the level and distribution of adult learning, International Studies in Sociology of Education, 23(2), pp. 182-203. [20 pages]
  1. PIKETTY, T. (2014) Capital in the Twenty-first Century (Introduction, p. 1-35). Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. [35 pages]
  1. SEN, A. (2009) The Idea of Justice (Introduction, p. 1-27). Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. [27 pages]
  1. INGLEHART, R., & WELZEL, C. (2010) Changing mass priorities: the link between modernization and democracy, Perspectives on Politics, 8(2), pp. 551-567. [11 pages]
  1. TORRES, C.A. (2015). Global citizenship and global universities. The age of global interdependence and cosmopolitanism, European Journal of Education, 50(3), pp. 262-289. [20 pages]
  1. RUBENSON, K. (2006). Constructing the lifelong learning paradigm: Competing vision from the OECD and UNESCO. In S. EHLERS (ed.), Milestones Towards Lifelong Learning Systems (p. 151-170). Copenhagen: Danish University of Education Press. [19 pages]
  1. CARNOY, M. (1999). Globalization and Educational Reform: What Planners Need to Know (Chapter III, p. 37-46 and Chapter V, p. 61-75). Paris: UNESCO-IIEP. [20 pages]
  1. POPKEWITZ, T.S. (1991). A Politicial Sociology of Educational Reform (Chapter 1, p. 13-44). New York: Teachers College Press. [30 pages]
  1. GIROUX, H. (2014). Neoliberalism’s War on Higher Education (Introduction, p. 1-28). Chicago: Haymarket Books. [28 pages]

Lecture Plan

Lecture 1 – Introduction and Overview

 Date: Tuesday 09.27.2016

Overview of themes

  1. The forces of social change and the impact of globalisation
  2. The rising significance of education
  3. Social policy, education and deliberate social change

Assigned Readings

LAUDER, H., BROWN, P., DILLABOUGH, J., & HALSEY, A.H. (2006). Introduction: The prospects for education: Individualization, Globalization, and Social Change. In: H. LAUDER, P. BROWN, J. DILLABOUGH, & A.H. HALSEY (eds), Education, Globalization & Social Change (p. 1-63). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Part I. The new setting for educational systems

Lecture 2 – Globalisation and the Knowledge Economy/Society

Date: Tuesday 10.11.2016

Overview of themes

  1. The global knowledge economy
  2. Modernity, post-structuralism and the knowledge society

Assigned Readings

BROWN, P. (2001). Globalization and the political economy of high skills. In: P. BROWN, A. GREEN, & H. LAUDER,

High Skills: Globalization, Competitive, and Skills Formation (p. 235-262). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

GIDDENS, A. (1991). Modernity and Self-Identity (Introduction, p. 1-9). Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Lecture 3 – Globalisation and Risk

Date: Tuesday 10.18.2016

Overview of themes

  1. Problems of the commons and other coordination problems
  2. Risk society
  3. Critical pedagogy

Assigned Readings

DESJARDINS, R. (2013). Considerations of the impact of neoliberalism and alternative regimes on learning and its outcomes: With an empirical example based on the level and distribution of adult learning, International Studies in Sociology of Education, 23(2), pp.182-203.

 

Lecture 4 – Globalisation and Social Disadvantage

 Date: Tuesday 10.25.2016

Overview of themes

  1. Structural inequality and social disadvantage
  2. Ideas of Justice
  3. Freedoms, functionings and capabilities

Assigned Readings

PIKETTY, T. (2014) Capital in the Twenty-first Century (Introduction, p. 1-35). Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.

SEN, A. (2009) The Idea of Justice (Introduction, p. 1-27). Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.

Lecture 5 – Globalisation and Democracy

 Date: Tuesday 11.01.2016

Overview of themes

  1. The modernization hypothesis and social reproduction
  2. Education for social transformation

Assigned Readings

INGLEHART, R., & WELZEL, C. (2010) Changing mass priorities: the link between modernization and democracy,

Perspectives on Politics, 8(2), pp. 551-567. Lecture 6 – Globalisation and Citizenship Date: Tuesday 11.08.2016

Overview of themes

  1. Types of citizenship
  2. State, market and stakeholder forms of governance

Assigned Readings

TORRES, C.A. (2015). Global citizenship and global universities. The age of global interdependence and cosmopolitanism, European Journal of Education, 50(3), pp. 262-289.

Part II. Reform dynamics in educational systems Lecture 7 – Globalisation and Lifelong Learning Date: Tuesday 11.15.2016

Overview of themes

  1. Global policy concepts in education reform
  2. Lifelong learning concepts and models
  3. Lifelong learning as a complement and substitute to education

Assigned Readings

RUBENSON, K. (2006). Constructing the lifelong learning paradigm: Competing vision from the OECD and UNESCO. In S. EHLERS (ed.), Milestones Towards Lifelong Learning Systems (p. 151-170). Copenhagen: Danish University of Education Press.

Lecture 8 – Globalisation and K-12 Educational Reform

Date: Tuesday 11.22.2016

Overview of themes

  1. New public management in education
  2. The measurement industry in education
  3. No Child Left Behind Act

Assigned Readings

CARNOY, M. (1999). Globalization and Educational Reform: What Planners Need to Know (Chapter III, p. 37-46 and Chapter V, p. 61-75). Paris: UNESCO-IIEP.

POPKEWITZ, T.S. (1991). A Politicial Sociology of Educational Reform (Chapter 1, p. 13-44). New York: Teachers College Press.

Lecture 9 – Globalisation and Higher Education Reform

Date: Tuesday 11.29.2016

Overview of themes

  1. Knowledge and power in educational reform
  2. Importance of comparative studies as tools to study institutional variation
  3. Critical analysis

Assigned Readings

GIROUX, H. (2014). Neoliberalism’s War on Higher Education (Introduction, p. 1-28). Chicago: Haymarket Books.

 

TA Session Plan

TA Session 1 – Introduction and Overview

Date: Thursday 09.29.2016

Part 1 – Discussion

Discussion and activities to be led by TA and all students are expected to participate.

Part 2 – Group work

Group work for Projects 1 and 2 to be organized.

TA Session 2 – Extended Discussion of Assignments

 Date: Thursday 10.6.2016

Part 1 – APA Style and Analytical Review Example

Discussion of APA style and how to write a substantive analytical review (Project 1)

Part 2 – Additional Housekeeping and Office Hours Required for any new students enrolled in the course

TA Session 3 – Globalisation and the Knowledge Economy/Society

 Date: Thursday 10.13.2016

Part 1 – Discussion

Discussion and activities to be led by TA and all students are expected to participate.

Part 2 – Group work

Two students within each of five groups will present their work in relation to Project 1 and lead discussion for 20 minutes.

TA Session 4 – Globalisation and Risk 

Date: Thursday 10.20.2016

Part 1 – Discussion

Discussion and activities to be led by TA and all students are expected to participate.

Part 2 – Group work

Two students within each of five groups will present their work in relation to Project 1 and lead discussion for 20 minutes.

TA Session 5 – Globalisation and Social Disadvantage

Date: Thursday 10.27.2016

Part 1 – Discussion

Discussion and activities to be led by TA and all students are expected to participate.

Part 2 – Group work

Two students within each of five groups will present their work in relation to Project 1 and lead discussion for 20 minutes.

TA Session 6 – Globalisation and Democracy

Date: Thursday 11.03.2016

Part 1 – Discussion

Discussion and activities to be led by TA and all students are expected to participate.

Part 2 – Group work

Two students within each of five groups will present their work in relation to Project 1 and lead discussion for 20 minutes.

TA Session 7 – Globalisation and Citizenship 

Date: Thursday 11.10.2016

NOTE: Project 1 due in section (paper copy), and submit digital copy online

Part 1 – Discussion

Discussion and activities to be led by TA and all students are expected to participate.

Part 2 – Group work

Three students within each of five groups will present their work in relation to Project 2 and lead discussion for 15 minutes.

TA Session 8 – Globalisation and Lifelong Learning

Date: Thursday 11.17.2016

Part 1 – Discussion

Discussion and activities to be led by TA and all students are expected to participate.

Part 2 – Group work

Three students within each of five groups will present their work in relation to Project 2 and lead discussion for 15 minutes.

TA Session 9 – Globalisation and Educational Reform

 Date: Thursday 12.01.2016

Part 1 – Discussion

Discussion and activities to be led by TA and all students are expected to participate.

Part 2 – Group work

Three students within each of five groups will present their work in relation to Project 2 and lead discussion for 15 minutes.

NOTE: Please submit project 2 online by Friday December 9th, no later than 5pm

EDUC 187: Variable Topics in Education: Global Citizenship Education

EDUC 187: Variable Topics in Education: Global Citizenship Education

Tuesdays, 1-5pm Moore 3030

Instructors:

Dr. Carlos Alberto Torres, Distinguished Professor of Education and UNESCO UCLA Chair in Global Learning and Global Citizenship Education

Dr. Jason Dorio, Post-Doctoral Scholar, UNESCO UCLA Chair in Global Learning and Global Citizenship Education

Course Description:

This course explores issues of Global Citizenship in education and society as a whole by analyzing critical challenges and envisioning possible solutions to

the multiple layers of the theoretical, empirical, and practical implementation of global citizenship education. This course examines how global citizenship education and education for sustainable development are beginning to impact the life, actions, policies and practices of educators, students, NGOs, governments, multi-national organizations, and other key players in local and global

contexts. Students will examine how Global Citizenship Education impacts our worldview, teaching, and learning as we strive to envision and work towards a more just and sustainable society.

RATIONALE FOR THE COURSE

Citizenship education has been traditionally associated to ‘civic education’, that is the teaching of constitutional democracy and obedience to the nation-state. Three categories are linked to civics education. The first one is civic knowledge, which in the context of constitutional democracy entails the knowledge of basic concepts informing the practice of democracy such as public elections, majority rule, citizenship rights and obligations, constitutional separation of power, and the placement of democracy in a market economy, used as the basic premises of civil society. The second category associated with citizenship building is civic skills, which usually means the intellectual and participatory skills that facilitate citizenship’s judgment and actions. The last category is civic virtues, usually defined in Western societies around liberal principles such as self-discipline, compassion, civility, tolerance and respect. However, within the context of the current era globalization(s) and its complex social, economic, political, cultural and environmental impacts, many questions regarding the nature of citizenship education and the construction of citizens remain:

In what ways will global citizenship education be included into definitions of citizenship building? How has the concept of GCE been incorporated in the contemporary discourses circulating and competing in the international system, governments and academia? What is the role of UNESCO and the UNITED NATIONS in promoting GCE and Education for Sustainable Development? These are some of the themes that will be addressed in this course, and are connected with the dominant agendas in the multiple globalizations that we are experiencing and slowly but surely are altering the way we understand education and learning in the 21st century. These themes are also connected to the controversies around citizenship building, diversity and the dilemmas of multiculturalism, and interact with the responsibilities of universities and adult learning systems in promoting citizenship building. This course is a systematic introduction to reveal multiple layers for understanding the meta-theoretical, theoretical and empirical implementation of global citizenship education.

The movement towards global citizenship education and education for sustainable development is beginning to impact the life, actions, policies and practices of Ministries and Secretariats of Education and Ministries of Foreign Affairs the world over, and therefore impacting the way that teacher’s training and teachers are working in diverse environments.

Class Outline

Session #1 (1/10): We will discuss the syllabus and some of the recent developments in Global Citizenship Education or what Torres has called the Realpolitik of GCE. [Organization of the work in groups.]

  1. Carlos Alberto Torres, Education for Global Citizenship. Chapter for the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Education (in press, to be published 2017).
  2. Global Citizenship Education. Preparing learners for the challenges of the twenty-first century

Session #2 (1/17): Ask the question of why global citizenship and why now, and advances some theses fully documented in the following sessions.

  1. Massimiliano Tarozzi and Carlos Alberto Torres, Global Citizenship Education and the Crises of Multiculturalism. Comparative Perspectives. London, Bloomsbury, 2017.

Session #3 (1/24): Discusses the tensions between collaboration and competition in the world system, a tension that surely impacts both national citizenship education and the project of global citizenship education per se. We will also focus on the diverse agendas of globalization. Analyzes three dominant agendas of globalization that includes Hyper-globalists, Skeptics and Transformationists. These developmental agendas play by definition a role of how people, institutions, corporations and governments with their political agendas position themselves in the debates about global citizenship education.

  1. Carlos Alberto Torres. Theoretical and Empirical Foundations of Global Citizenship Education. New York, Routledge, in press.

Session #4 (1/31): Visiting Speaker: Dr. Aly Juma on Paulo Freire Model and the construction of citizenship through literacy.

  1. The adult literacy process as cultural action for freedom. Harvard Educational Review; Cambridge; Winter 1998; Paulo Freire; Volume: 68 (1970)

Its available from this link:

  1. http://courseweb.ischool.illinois.edu/~katewill/spring2014- 502/background%20reading/friere%20cultural_action_for_conscientization.pdf

Session #5 (2/7): Discusses the new common sense of neoliberalism and how it impacts the university and by implication citizenship building. Organized around seven iconoclastic theses, this session offers a foundation or building blocks to understand the interaction of universities and their role in citizenship building. [Group Paper #1 and Individual Reflection Due]

Torres, Routledge book in press

Session #6 (2/14): Offers a typology of national universities and global universities, which is both analytical and provocative, linking universities and public spheres as well as global and local imaginaries affecting citizenship building.

Torres, Routledge book in press

Session #7 (2/21): Is tributary of Torres’ joint book just published with Massimiliano Tarozzi, and discusses the question of multiculturalism in the world system with a particular emphasis on social justice education. This discussion has implications for citizenship building in general and global citizenship education in particular.

  1. Massimiliano Tarozzi and Carlos Alberto Torres, Global Citizenship Education and the Crises of Multiculturalism. Comparative Perspectives. London, Bloomsbury, 2017.

Session #8 (2/28): Adult Learning and Global Citizenship Education, offers commentaries aimed at the practitioners working in the difficult trenches of adult learning education.

Torres, Routledge, book in press.

Session #9 (3/7): Visiting Speaker: Dr. Chitra Golestani will present on Global Citizenship Education and Peace Education analyzing possibilities and limitations of these concepts through innovative and participatory instructional strategies.  Required reading and viewing for this session include:

  • Andreaotti, V. (2006). Soft versus critical global citizenship education. Policy and Practice: A Development Education Review. Center for Global Education, 3, 40-51. Available

Session #10 (3/14): Ask the question: could Global Citizenship Education became a global social movement? [Group Presentations]

Torres, Routledge, book in press.

FINALS (3/21): No Class meeting. Group Paper #2 and Individual Reflections Due

Course Organization and Evaluation.

The first two hours will consist of lectures and commentaries by the instructors and Q&A. The second part of the session will consist of work by students under the guidance of the instructors, and student’s presentation of their bibliographical reviews and analysis.

This course will focus on an extensive bibliographical review to be accomplished by the students under the guidance of co-Instructor Dr. Jason Dorio.

Participation in class will be worth 10% of the final grade, two papers will be worth 40% each, and presentations in class will be worth 10%. Each paper will be written by a group and following specific requests from the instructors.

Important Dates:

Week 1, January 10: Group Selection.

Week 4, January 31: Dr. Torres and Dr. Dorio attending a conference. Visiting Speaker Dr. Aly Juma.

Week 5, February 7: GROUP PAPER 1 and Individual Reflections due by 11:59pm

Week 9, March 7: Dr. Dorio and Dr. Torres attending a conference on Global Citizenship Education. Visiting Speaker Dr. Chitra Goldestani.

Week 10, March 13: Group Presentations

[Finals] March 21: GROUP PAPER 2 and Individual Reflections due by 11:59pm

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Mandatory

Massimiliano Tarozzi and Carlos Alberto Torres, Global Citizenship Education and the Crises of Multiculturalism. Comparative Perspectives. London, Bloomsbury, 2017.

Carlos Alberto Torres, Education for Global Citizenship. Chapter for the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Education (in press, to be published 2017)

UNESCO. Global Citizenship Education. Preparing Learners for the Challenges of the Twenty-First Century. UNESCO, Paris, 2014.

Carlos Alberto Torres. Theoretical and Empirical Foundations of Critical Global Citizenship Education. New York, Routledge, in press.

Recommended

Abdi A and Shultz L (eds) (2008) Educating For Human Rights and Global Citizenship. New York: SUNY Press.

Abdi A and Shultz L (2010) (Re)-imagining a shared future through education for global social justice. International Journal of Curriculum and Instruction. VII(1), 128– 139.

Andreaotti, V. (2006). Soft versus critical global citizenship education. Policy and Practice: A Development Education Review. Center for Global Education, 3, 40- 51.

Andreotti, V. & de Souza, L.M. (Eds.) (2011). Postcolonial Perspectives on Global Citizenship Education. London/ NewYork: Routledge.

Banks, J. A. (2004). Teaching for social justice, diversity, and citizenship in a global world. The educational forum, 68(4), 296-305.

Banks, J. A. (2008). Diversity, group identity, and citizenship education in a global age. Educational researcher, 37(3), 129-139.

Chui, W. H., & Leung, E. W. (2014). Youth in a global world: attitudes towards globalization and global citizenship among university students in Hong Kong. Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 34(1), 107-124.

Coryell, J. E., Spencer, B. J., & Sehin, O. (2013). Cosmopolitan Adult Education and Global Citizenship: Perceptions From a European Itinerant Graduate-Professional Study Abroad Program. Adult Education Quarterly, 64 (2), 145-164.

Davies, L. (2006). Global citizenship: Abstraction or framework for action? Educational Review, 58 (1), 5-25.

Davies, I., Evans, M., & Reid, A. (2005). Globalizing citizenship education? A critique of “global education” and “citizenship education.” British Journal of Educational Studies, 53(1), 66-89.

Davies, I., & Pike, G. (2008). Global citizenship education. In R. Lewin (Ed.) Handbook of Practice and Research in Study Abroad: Higher Education and the Quest for Global Citizenship. NY: Routledge., 61-78.

D’Cruz, B., & Osipova, D. O. (2011). Education for Sustainable Development and Global Citizenship (ESDGC): The Implications for Higher Education institutions in the Russian Federation. Contemporary Higher Education: Innovative Aspects / Sovremennaia Vysshaia Shkola: Innovatsionny Aspect, (2), 43-48.

Education Above All. (2012): Education for global citizenship. Doha, Qatar: Education Above All. Retrieved May 14, 2014, from http://www.ineesite.org/uploads/files/ resources/ EAA_ Education_for_Global_Citizenship.pdf

Eidoo, S., Ingram, L., MacDonald, A., Nabavi, M., Pashby, K., & Stille, S. (2011). “Through the Kaleidoscope”: Intersections between Theoretical Perspectives and Classroom Implications in Critical Global Citizenship Education. Canadian Journal Of Education, 34(4), 59-84.

Engel, L. C. (2014). Global citizenship and national (re) formations: Analysis of citizenship education reform in Spain. Education, Citizenship and Social Justice, 9(3), 239-254.

Evans, M. (2008). Educating for “Global Citizenship” in Schools: Emerging Understandings. In K. Munday (ed) Comparative and International Education: Issue for Teachers. Toronto, Ontario: Canadian Scholars’ Press Inc., 273-298.

Evans, M., Ingram, L.A., MacDonald A., & Weber, N. (2009). Mapping the “global dimension” of citizenship education in Canada: The complex interplay of theory, practice and context. Citizenship, Teaching & Learning, 5 (2), 17-34.

Galiero, M., Grech, W., & Kalweit, D. (2009). Global citizenship education: The school as a foundation for a fair world. Outlook Coop.

Gaudelli, W. (2009). Heuristics of Global Citizenship Discourses towards Curriculum Enhancement, Journal of Curriculum Theorizing, 25 (1), 68-85.

Green, M.F. (2012). Global Citizenship: What Are We Talking About and Why Does it Matter? Trends & Insights: For International Education, January 2012, 1-4.

Jorgenson, S. (2010). De-centering and re-visioning global citizenship education abroad programs. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 3 (1), 1-24.

Jorgenson, S. & Shultz, L. (2012). Global Citizenship Education (GCE) in Post- Secondary Institutions: What is Protected and what is Hidden under the Umbrella of GCE? Journal of Global Citizenship & Equity Education, 2(2).

Lee, W. O & Leung, S. W. (2006). Global Citizenship Education In Hong Kong and Shanghai Secondary Schools: Ideals, Realities and Expectations. Citizenship Teaching and Learning, 2(2), 68-84.

Lewin, R. (2009). The handbook of practice and research in study abroad: higher education and the quest for global citizenship. New York, Washington, DC: Routledge ; Association of American Colleges and Universities.

Marino, M. T., & Hayes, M. T. (2012). Promoting Inclusive Education, Civic Scientific Literacy, and Global Citizenship with Videogames. Cultural Studies Of Science Education, 7(4), 945-954.

Mayo, M., Gaventa, J., & Rooke, A. (2009). Learning global citizenship? Exploring connections between the local and the global. Education, Citizenship and Social Justice, 4(2), 161-175.

Nguyen, T.T. A. (2013). Towards Skillful Global Citizenship Education. Paideusis, 21(1), 26-38.

Ortega, L., Cordón-Pedregosa, R., & Sianes, A. (2013). University and Non-government Organisations: Indispensable Partners in Global Citizenship Education in Spain. The New Educational Review, 34(4), 74-84.

Oxfam (1997). A curriculum for global citizenship. Oxford: Oxfam Development Education Programme.

Oxfam (2006). Education for global citizenship: A guide for schools. London, United Kingdom: Oxfam. Available online at http://www.oxfam.org.uk/education/gc/

Peters, M. A., Britton, A., & Blee, H. (2008). Global citizenship education: Philosophy, theory and pedagogy. Sense Publishers Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Petrovic, J., & Kuntz, A. (Eds.). (2014). Citizenship Education: Local Contexts and Global Possibilities. NY: Routledge.

Pigozzi, M. J. (2006). A UNESCO view of global citizenship education. Educational Review, 58(1), 1-4.

Puka, E. (2013). Political Education. The Global Education of Citizen through Active Citizenship. Studi sulla formazione, 16(2), 229-236.

Reilly, J., & Niens, U. (2014). Global Citizenship as Education for Peacebuilding in a Divided Society: Structural and Contextual Constraints on the Development of Critical Dialogic Discourse in Schools. Compare: A Journal Of Comparative Education, 44(1), 53-76.

Rhoads, R. and Szelenyi, L. (2011). Global Citizenship and the University: Advancing Social Life and Relations in an Interdependent World. Stanford: CA, Stanford: University Press.

Russell, W. I., & Waters, S. (2013). Character Education: Using Film to Promote Global Citizenship. Childhood Education, 89(5), 303-309.

Schattle, H. (2007). The Practices of Global Citizenship. Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, Inc.

Schattle, H. (2008). Education for global citizenship: Illustrations of ideological pluralism and adaptation. Journal of Political Ideologies, 13(1), 73-94.

Schattle, H. (2009). Global Citizenship in Theory and Practice. In The Handbook of Practice and Research in Study Abroad: Higher Education and the Quest for Global Citizenship, ed. R. Lewin. NewYork: Routledge, 3-20.

Shultz, L. (2007). Educating for global Citizenship: Conflicting Agendas and Understandings. Alberta Journal of Educational Research, 53(3), 248-258.

Shultz, L., Abdi, A. A., & Richardson, G. H. (2010). Global Citizenship Education in Post-Secondary Institutions: Theories, Practices, and Policies. New York, Peter Lang.

Shultz, L., & Guimaraes-losif, R. (2012). Citizenship education and the promise of democracy: A study of UNESCO Associated Schools in Brazil and Canada.

Education, Citizenship and Social Justice, 7(3), 241-254.

Stromquist, N. (2009). Theorizing Global Citizenship: Discourses, Challenges, and Implications for Education. Interamerican Journal of Education for Democracy, 2 (1), 6-29.

Su, F., Bullivant, A. and Holt, V. (2013). Global Citizenship Education. In Curtis, W., et al (eds) Education Studies -An Issues Based Approach (3rd Edition). Exeter: Sage/Learning Matters, 231-244.

Tawil, S. (2013). Education for ‘Global Citizenship’: A framework for discussion.

Unesco education research and foresight, Paris. [erf working papers series, no. 7].

Tawil, S. (2014). Education for ‘Global Citizenship’: Beyond the ‘Fuzzword.’ Norrag Website. Web. Retrieved from: http://norrag.wordpress.com/2014/02/03/education-for-global-citizenship-beyond-the-fuzzword/

Tormey, R., & Gleeson, J. (2012). The gendering of global citizenship: findings from a large-scale quantitative study on global citizenship education experiences. Gender and Education, 24(6), 627-645.

UNESCO (2011). Contemporary Issues in Human Rights Education. Paris: UNESCO.

UNESCO (2013). Global Citizenship Education: An Emerging Perspective. Outcome document of the Technical Consultation on Global Citizenship Education. http://www.unesco.org/ new/en/education/resources/online-materials/single view/news/unescos_seoul_ consultation_deepens_understanding_of_ global_citizenship_education/#.UjxKSX-bFng.

UNESCO Bangkok Office (2014). Learning to Live Together: Education Policies and Realities in the Asia-Pacific. Paris and Bangkok: UNESCO.

Veugelers, W. (2011). The moral and the political in global citizenship: appreciating differences in education. Globalisation, Societies and Education, 9 (3-4): 473-485.

Young, M., & Commins, E. (2002). Global citizenship: The handbook for primary teaching. Oxford, UK: Oxfam.

Zahabioun, S. et al (2013). Global Citizenship Education and Its Implications for Curriculum Goals at the Age of Globalizations. International Education Studies, 6 (1), 195-206.

Zhao, Z. (2013). The shaping of citizenship education in a Chinese context. Frontiers of Education in China, 8(1), 105-122.

EDUCATION 187-Sem3: Global Citizenship Education

EDUCATION 187-Sem3: Global Citizenship Education

SPRING 2017

Instructor: Jason Nunzio Dorio, Ph.D.                     Classroom: Math Hall 3140                       Office: Math Sciences Building, 8302                       Class Time: Tuesday 1PM-4:50PM                 Email: jndorio@g.ucla.edu                                         Office Hours: By Appointment

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Global citizenship education has been an attempt by international institutions such as UNESCO to assist local and national policy makers and practitioners in addressing the multifaceted challenges of globalization(s) that impact education and society. However, many questions remain regarding the nature and possibility of education that can foster a global citizenship necessary to understand and resolve the world’s most pressing issues. This course seeks to confront such questions by focusing on the curriculum and instruction of global citizenship education. Using local and global research, the course will explore and analyze various perspectives, curricula and pedagogies pertaining to the teaching and implementation of global citizenship education at different levels of education.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

Through lectures, discussions, active student participation, various readings and research, and group activities, students will be able:

  • To co-create a safe and authentic learning community
  • To explore a various literature, research and media related to a range of perspectives and teaching practices of global citizenship education
  • To analyze themes of global citizenship education (e.g. human rights education, multicultural education, education for sustainable development, peace education, etc…)
  • To teach lessons related global challenges
  • To design and teach a global citizenship education unit plan that focuses on UN SDGs (United Nations Sustainable Development Goals).

REQUIRED AND RECOMMENDED READINGS

Students can purchase required at UCLA Bookstore. Most of the weekly readings will be posted on UCLA CCLE.

  1. Kelleher and Klein (2011). Global Perspectives (Ed. 4). Pearson Higher Ed.
  2. Smith, D. (2012). The Penguin State of the World Atlas (Ed. 9).
  3. Oxfam (1997). A curriculum for global citizenship. Oxford: Oxfam Development Education Programme.
  4. Oxfam (2006). Education for global citizenship: A guide for schools. London, United Kingdom: Oxfam. Available online at http://www.oxfam.org.uk/education/gc/
  5. C.A. (2017) Theoretical and Empirical Foundations of Critical Global Citizenship Education. New York, Routledge.
  6. UNESCO (2014). Global citizenship education: Preparing learners for the challenges of the twenty-first century. Paris, France: UNESO. Available at http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0022/002277/227729E.pdf
  7. UNESCO (2015). Global Citizenship Education: Topics and Learning Objectives. Available at http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0023/002329/232993e.pdf

ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING

  1. Attendance and Readings (10%): Students are expected to attend every course session and complete all required readings/assignments to fully participate in each class meetings.
  2. Global Challenge Lesson (40%): Students will be asked to prepare a research paper and mini lesson on a global challenge of their choice. The topic must be approved by the instructor prior to teaching the mini lesson.
    • Research Paper (25 %): Students will select a single global issue guided by the questions what is the biggest challenge facing humanity or the planet and how are people actively addressing the challenge? The paper will be 5-page, double-space including bibliography in APA format. Guiding questions for the paper: what is the global challenge, what are some causes, and who/what does it impact (5%)? What are some of the innovative/creative ways people are addressing the global challenge (5%)? What are the consequences if it is not addresses (5%)? What can UCLA students do address the challenge (10%)?
    • Mini Lesson (15%): Students will sign up for a presentation day during Week 1. Beginning on Week 4 students will present a 20-minute lesson pertaining to the global challenge they selected. Creative and innovative ways of teaching this information is expected.
  1. Group Unit Plan on UN SDGs (50%): In self-selected groups of 4-5 students, students will design a five-day unit plan covering at least 2 of the 17 UN SDGs (United Nations Sustainable Development Goals). https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/sdgs.
    • Unit Plan Report (25%): Introduction: Title, purpose, what are the UN SDGS that will be covered, and context (describe what age group is this unit designed for and what are the demographics of the students and educational space) Framework and Theory: what are the core principals and concepts of this unit? What skills, knowledge and virtues are being emphasized? Why are the principals and concepts important and what literature/research supports the framework? Teaching Practices (5%): How are the teaching practices and content culturally and contextually relevant and interdisciplinary? How do the teaching practices relevant to a pedagogy for critical global citizenship education? Table of five lessons (5%): name of lessons, learning objectives, key activities, name/number of SDGs. Detailed Description of 5 individual lessons (5%): Description of the lesson, learning objective, activities, assessments, key materials and literature. Note that one lesson must include some form of community engagement project/exercise.
    • 45-minute lesson (25%): Groups present a 45-minute lesson of one of the lessons for their Unit Plan. All relevant information of the particular lesson must be creatively taught to the class.

COURSE POLICIES AND UNIVERSITY RESOURCES

  1. Student Code of Conduct

Students are expected to be familiar with university policies on conduct within the class and on campus, specifically on cheating and plagiarism and associated penalties. http://www.deanofstudents.ucla.edu/portals/16/documents/uclacodeofconduct_rev030416.pdf

For detailed information about academic integrity, please visit the Office of the Dean of Students website at http://www.deanofstudents.ucla.edu/students/integrity/.

2.     Students with Disabilities

Students needing academic accommodations based on a disability should contact the Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD) at (310) 825-1501 or in person at Murphy Hall A255. When possible, students

should contact the OSD within the first two weeks of the term as reasonable notice is needed to coordinate accommodations. For more information visit www.osd.ucla.edu.

3.     Undergraduate Writing Center

The Undergraduate Writing Center offers UCLA undergraduates one-on-one sessions on their writing. The Center is staffed by peer learning facilitators (PLFs), undergraduates who are trained to help at any stage in the writing process and with writing assignments from across the curriculum. PLFs tailor appointments to the concerns of each writer. Sessions can focus on how to approach an assignment, on formulating a thesis, on fleshing out a plan/outline for a draft, on reading a draft with the writer to check for clarity and flow, on incorporating and citing sources, on revising a paper based on instructor feedback, or on tackling grammar or sentence structure problems. (http://wp.ucla.edu/wc/).

4.     Mobile Phones and Computer Devices

Please turn off mobile phones at the beginning of class. Any disruption of class due to the audible beeping or the use of mobile phones is treated as a violation of Section 102.13 of the UCLA Student Conduct Code (http://www.deanofstudents.ucla.edu/Code_choice.php). Additionally, during class, all computer devices used in class must be for note taking purposes only.

STRUCTURE OF THE COURSE

Each four-hour class meeting will be divided into three parts. The first part will be devoted to lecture and student-centered discussions facilitated by the instructor on global challenge. The second will be devoted be devoted to lecture and student-centered discussions facilitated by the instructor related to themes of global citizenship education connected to the global challenge of a given week. The last part with be lectures and discussion facilitated by students on pertaining to students’ Global Challenge Lesson (Assignment 2).

WEEK 1: The Dilemmas Of Citizenship And Citizenship Education. In addition to an general introduction to the course, this week will be guided by foundational questions such as what is citizenship and what is citizenship education? Class discussion on ideas of membership in a polity; collective benefits and rights; participation/political/social agency and responsibility; and knowledge/political socialization will be presented. Additionally, various perspectives to citizenship, such as critical and active models of citizenship will be intertwined with showcases various approaches and dilemmas of citizenship education.

WEEK 2: The Dialectics Of Globalization(s) And The Demand For A Critical Global Citizenship Education. This week will be devoted to describing the current era of globalization and addressing such questions as how did we get here, where are key global phenomena, why the complexities of globalization demand a plurality of globalization to globalization(s)? What are the relationships between globalization and knowledge and learning? How and why does the challenges of globalization necessities a reframing of citizenship education? What is global citizenship education, who is it for and who is it by?

WEEK 3: Theoretical Contours Of Global Citizenship Education. This week is grounded in the question what are the various theoretical underpinnings of global citizenship education? There will be an analysis of theories of global citizenship education espoused by various authors.

WEEK 4: Teaching Global Citizenship Education: Towards A Pedagogy for SDGs. Through comparative global cases, this week will be devoted to exploring the various teaching practices and curricula are that are being implemented for global citizenship education. Additionally, the class will analyze the 17 UNSDGs (United Nations Development Goals) and discuss how they are connected to global citizenship education.

Student mini-lessons Begin.

WEEK 5: GCE Theme 1: Human Rights Education. This week will be guided by the question why is human rights education an integral part of global citizenship education? The class will be devoted to such questions as what is the UN Declaration on Human Rights, what are some contemporary human rights violations, what are some of the benefits and limitations of human rights education, and what are some of the best practices of teaching human rights education?   Student mini-lessons.

WEEK 6: GCE Theme 2: Issues of Diversity and Multicultural Education. This week will be guided by the question why is empathy and compassion for the other an integral part of global citizenship education? The class will first explore some issues related to racism, sexism, classism, homophobia, xenophobia and ableism around the world. The class will then discuss possible models of education that attempt address these issues such as multicultural (and intercultural) education, anti-racist education, inclusive education and culturally relevant pedagogy. Student mini-lessons.

WEEK 7: GCE Theme 3: Poverty, Global Inequality and Social Justice Education. This week will be guided by the question why is social justice education an integral part of global citizenship education? The class will first explore global issues of poverty, global inequalities of wealth and other human needs, and forms of marginalization and injustices. The class will discuss the relationship between civic minimums and critical and active citizenship. Additionally, the class will discuss models of social justice education.  Student mini-lessons.

WEEK 8: GCE Theme 4: Sustainable development and Ecopedagogy. This week will be guided by the question why is education for sustainable development an integral part of global citizenship education? The class will first explore some of the most pressing environmental issues around the global and the relationship between human and the planet. The class will then discuss models of education for sustainable development and debate the need for ecopedagogy.

WEEK 9: GCE Theme 5: Peace Education. This week will be guided by the question why is peace education an integral part of global citizenship education. The class will first explore issues related to violence and war.The class will then discuss the various models of peace education.

WEEK 10: GROUP UNIT PLAN LESSONS 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Theoretical and Epistemological Perspectives

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  1. Andreotti, V. (2015). Global citizenship education otherwise: pedagogical and theoretical insights. In Ali Abdi, Lynette Shultz, and Tashika Pillay (Eds.) Decolonizing Global Citizenship Education (pp. 221-230). Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.
  1. Andreotti, V. & de Souza, L.M. (2012). Postcolonial perspectives on global citizenship education. New York: Routledge.
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  1. Galiero, M., Grech, W., & Kalweit, D. (2009). Global citizenship education: The school as a foundation for a fair world. Outlook Coop.
  1. Gaudelli, W. (2009). Heuristics of global citizenship discourses toward curriculum enhancement. Journal of Curriculum Theorizing, 25(1), 68-85.
  1. Gaudelli, W. & Heilman, E. (2009). Reconceptualizing geography as democratic global citizenship education. Teachers College Record, 111(11), 2647-2677.
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  1. Green, M.F. (2012). Global Citizenship: What Are We Talking About and Why Does it Matter? Trends & Insights: For International Education, January 2012, 1-4.
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  1. Ibrahim, T. (2005). Global citizenship education: Mainstreaming the curriculum? Cambridge Journal of Education, 35(2), 177-194.
  1. Jayashree Inbaraj, Subbalakshmi Kumar, Hellen Sambili, & Alison Scott-Baumann. (2003). Women and Citizenship in Global Teacher Education: The Global-ITE Project. Gender and Development, 11(3), 83-92.
  1. Jickling, B., & Wals, A. E. J. (2008). Globalization and environmental education: looking beyond sustainable development. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 40(1), 1-21.
  1. Koyama, J. (2015). The Elusive and Exclusive Global Citizen. Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Education for Peace and Sustainable Development / UNESCO Working Paper
  1. Langmann, E. (2011). Representational and territorial economies in global citizenship education: Welcoming the other at the limit of cosmopolitan hospitality. Globalisation, Societies and Education, 9(3-4), 399-409.
  1. Mannion, G., Biesta, G., Priestley, M. & Ross, H. (2011). The global dimension in education and education for global citizenship: Genealogy and critique. Globalisation, Societies and Education, 9(3-4), 443-456.
  1. Marshall, H. (2011). Instrumentalism, ideals and imaginaries: Theorising the contested space of global citizenship education in schools. Globalisation, Societies and Education, 9(3-4), 411-426.
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  1. Nguyen, T.T. A. (2013). Towards Skillful Global Citizenship Education. Paideusis, 21(1), 26-38.
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  1. Parmenter, L. (2011). Power and place in the discourse of global citizenship education. Globalisation, Societies and Education, 9(3-4), 367-380.
  1. Pashby, K. (2011). Cultivating global citizens: Planting new seeds or pruning the perennials? Looking for the citizen-subject in global citizenship education theory. Globalisation, Societies and Education, 9(3-4), 427-442.
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  1. Pike, G. (2001). Towards an ethos of global citizenship education: some problems and possibilities. The Development Education Journal, 7(3), 30-32.
  1. Pike, G. (2008). Citizenship education in global context. Brock Education Journal, 17(1), 38-49.
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  1. Reimers, F. (2006). Citizenship, identity and education: Examining the public purposes of schools in an age of globalization. Prospects, 36(3), 275-294.
  1. Roman, L. G. (2003). Education and the contested meanings of ‘global citizenship.’ Journal of Educational Change, 4(3), 269-293.
  1. Schattle, H. (2007). The Practices of Global Citizenship. Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  1. Schattle, H. (2008). Education for global citizenship: Illustrations of ideological pluralism and adaptation. Journal of Political Ideologies, 13(1), 73-94.
  1. Schattle, H. (2009). Global Citizenship in Theory and Practice. In The Handbook of Practice and Research in Study Abroad: Higher Education and the Quest for Global Citizenship, R. Lewin. NewYork: Routledge, 3-20.
  1. Shultz, L. (2007). Educating for global citizenship: Conflicting agendas and understandings. Alberta Journal of Educational Research, 53(3), 248-258.
  1. Shultz, L. (2010). What do we ask of global citizenship education? International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning. 3 (1) 5-22.
  1. Shultz, L. (2015), ‘Decolonizing UNESCO’s post-2015 education agenda’, Postcolonial Directions in Education, 4(2): 96-115.
  1. Shultz, L., Abdi, A. A., & Richardson, G. H. (2010). Global Citizenship Education in Post-Secondary Institutions: Theories, Practices, and Policies. New York, Peter Lang.
  1. Standish, A. (2012), The False Promise of Global Learning: Why education needs boundaries. London: Bloomsbury.
  1. Stearns, P. N. (2009). Educating global citizens: Challenges and opportunities. New York: Routledge.
  1. Stromquist, N. (2009). Theorizing Global Citizenship: Discourses, Challenges, and Implications for Education. Interamerican Journal of Education for Democracy, 2 (1), 6- 29.
  1. Su, F., Bullivant, A. and Holt, V. (2013). Global Citizenship Education. In Curtis, W., et al (eds) Education Studies -An Issues Based Approach (3rd Edition). Exeter: Sage/Learning Matters, 231-244.
  1. Tarrant, M. A. (2010). A conceptual framework for exploring the role of studies abroad in nurturing global citizenship. Journal of Studies in International Education, 14(5), 433- 451.
  1. Tawil, S. (2014). Education for ‘Global Citizenship’: Beyond the ‘Fuzzword.’ Norrag Website. Web. Retrieved from: http://norrag.wordpress.com/2014/02/03/education -for- global-citizenship-beyond-the-fuzzword/
  1. Tarozzi, M. and Torres, C.A. (2017). Global Citizenship Education and the Crises of Multiculturalism. Comparative Perspectives. London, Bloomsbury.
  1. Torres, C.A. (Forthcoming). Global Citizenship Education: Theoretical and Empirical Foundations. Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Education.
  1. Torres, C.A. (2015). Global Citizenship and Global Universities. The Age of Global Interdependence and Cosmopolitanism. European Journal of Education, Vol. 50, No. 3, pp. 262-279.
  1. Torres, C.A (2015). Solidarity and competitiveness in a global context: comparable concepts in global citizenship education? The International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives, 14(2), 22-29.
  1. Torres, C.A. (2017). Theoretical and Empirical Foundations of Critical Global Citizenship Education. Routledge.
  1. Unterhalter, E. (2008). Cosmopolitanism, global social justice and gender equality in education. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education, 38 (5), 539-553.
  1. Veugelers, W. (2011). The moral and the political in global citizenship: Appreciating differences in education. Globalisation, Societies and Education, 9(3-4), 473-485.
  1. Watson, S. (2013). An exploration into the teaching of cosmopolitan ideals: The case of global citizenship. Citizenship, Social and Economics Education, 12(2), 110-117.
  1. White, C. & Openshaw, R. (Eds.). (2007). Democracy at the crossroads: International perspectives on critical global citizenship education. New York: Lexington Books.
  1. Wilde, S. (Ed.) (2005). Political and Citizenship Education. International Perspectives. Oxford: Symposium Books, Cambridge University Press.
  1. Wintersteiner, W., Grobbauer, H., Diendorfer, G., and Reitmair-Juárez, S. (2015), Global Citizenship Education Citizenship Education for Globalizing Societies. Klagenfurt, AT: Zentrum für Friedensforschung und Friedenspädagogik. Retrieved from: http://www.peace-ed-campaign.org/global-citizenship-education-citizenship-education- for-globalizing-societies/
  1. Zahabioun, S. et al (2013). Global Citizenship Education and Its Implications for Curriculum Goals at the Age of Globalizations. International Education Studies, 6 (1), 195-206.

Empirical Research

Nonformal

Hartung, C. (2017). Global citizenship incorporated: competing responsibilities in the education of global citizens. Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education. 38 (1), 16-29.

Marino, M. T., & Hayes, M. T. (2012). Promoting Inclusive Education, Civic Scientific Literacy, and Global Citizenship with Videogames. Cultural Studies Of Science Education, 7(4), 945-954.

Study Abroad

Jorgenson, S. (2010). De-centering and re-visioning global citizenship education abroad programs. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 3 (1), 1-24.

Lewin, R. (Ed.) (2009). The handbook of practice and research in study abroad: higher education and the quest for global citizenship. New York, Washington, DC: Routledge.

Local, National, and International Curricula

  1. Ali, M. A. (2009). Preparing citizens for a globalized world: The role of the social studies curriculum. Inter-American Journal of Education for Democracy, 2(2), 237-256.
  1. Chong, E. K. (2015). Global citizenship education and Hong Kong’s secondary school curriculum guidelines: From learning about rights and understanding responsibility to challenging inequality. Asian Education and Development Studies, 4(2), 221-247.
  1. Davies, I., & Issitt, J. (2005). Reflections on Citizenship Education in Australia, Canada and England. Comparative Education, 41(4), 389-410.
  1. Davies, I., & Pike, G. (2008). Global citizenship education: Challenges and Possibilities. In Lewin (Ed.) Handbook of Practice and Research in Study Abroad: Higher Education and the Quest for Global Citizenship. NY: Routledge., 61-78.
  1. D’Cruz, B., & Osipova, D. O. (2011). Education for Sustainable Development and Global Citizenship (ESDGC): The Implications for Higher Education institutions in the Russian Federation. Contemporary Higher Education: Innovative Aspects / Sovremennaia Vysshaia Shkola: Innovatsionny Aspect, (2), 43-48.
  1. Engel, L. C. (2014). Global citizenship and national (re) formations: Analysis of citizenship education reform in Spain. Education, Citizenship and Social Justice, 9(3), 239-254.
  1. Frey, C. J. & Whitehead, D. M. (2009). International education policies and the boundaries of global citizenship in the US. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 41(2): 269- 290.
  1. Gardner-McTaggart, A. (2016). International elite, or global citizens? Equity, distinction and power: The International Baccalaureate and the rise of the South. Globalization, Societies and Education, 14 (1), 1-29.
  1. Gaudelli, W. (2007). Global courts, global judges, and a multicitizen curriculum. Theory & Research in Social Education, 35(3), 465-491.
  1. Girard, B. & Harris, L. M. (2013). Considering world history as a space for developing global citizenship competencies. The Educational Forum, 77(4), 438-449.
  1. Harshman, J., Augustine, T., and Merryfield, M. (2015). Research in Global Citizenship Education. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing
  1. Karlberg, M. (2010). Education for Interdependence: The University and the Global Citizen. The Global Studies Journal, 3(1), 129-138.
  1. Jorgenson, S. & Shultz, L. (2012). Global Citizenship Education (GCE) in Post- Secondary Institutions: What is Protected and what is Hidden under the Umbrella of GCE? Journal of Global Citizenship & Equity Education, 2(2).
  1. Law, W. W. (2004). Globalization and citizenship education in Hong Kong and Taiwan. Comparative Education Review, 48(3), 253-273.
  1. Law, W. W., & Ng, H. M. (2009). Globalization and multileveled citizenship education: A tale of two Chinese cities, Hong Kong and Shanghai. Teachers College Record, 111(4), 851- 892.
  1. Law et al (2011) Citizenship and Citizenship Education in a Global Age: Politics, Policies and Practices in China. New York. Peter Lang Publishing Inc.
  1. Lee, W. O & Leung, S. W. (2006). Global Citizenship Education In Hong Kong and Shanghai Secondary Schools: Ideals, Realities and Expectations. Citizenship Teaching and Learning, 2(2), 68-84.
  1. Lim, C. P. (2008). Global citizenship education, school curriculum and games: Learning Mathematics, English and Science as a global citizen. Computers & Education, 51(3), 1073-1093.
  1. Moon, R., & Koo, J. (2011). Global Citizenship and Human Rights: A Longitudinal Analysis of Social Studies and Ethics Textbooks in the Republic of Korea. Comparative Education Review, 55(4), 574-599
  1. Myers, J. P. (2006). Rethinking the social studies curriculum in the context of globalization: Education for global citizenship in the U.S. Theory and Research in Social Education, 34(3), 370-394.
  1. Ortega, L., Cordón-Pedregosa, R., & Sianes, A. (2013). University and Non-government Organisations: Indispensable Partners in Global Citizenship Education in Spain. The New Educational Review, 34(4), 74-84.
  1. Parker, W., Ninomiya, A. & Cogan, J. (1999). Educating world citizens: Toward multinational curriculum development. American Educational Research Journal, 36(2), 117-145.
  1. Roman, L. G. (2004). States of Insecurity: Cold War memory, “global citizenship” and its discontents. Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, 25 (2), 231-259.
  1. Shultz, L., & Guimaraes-losif, R. (2012). Citizenship education and the promise of democracy: A study of UNESCO Associated Schools in Brazil and Canada. Education, Citizenship and Social Justice, 7(3), 241-254.
  1. Sperandio, J., Grudzinski-Hall, M., & Stewart-Gambino, H. (2010). Developing an undergraduate global citizenship program: Challenges of definition and assessment. International Journal of Teaching & Learning in Higher Education, 22(1), 12-22.
  1. Subedi, B. (Ed.) (2010), Critical Global Perspectives: Rethinking curricular knowledge on global societies. Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing.
  1. Tormey, R., & Gleeson, J. (2012). The gendering of global citizenship: findings from a large-scale quantitative study on global citizenship education experiences. Gender and Education, 24(6), 627-645.
  1. Veugelers, W. (2011). Theory and Practice of Citizenship Education. The Case of Policy, Science and Education in the Netherlands. Revista de Educación, número extraordinario 2011, pp. 209-224.
  1. Zhao, Z. (2013). The shaping of citizenship education in a Chinese context. Frontiers of Education in China, 8(1), 105-122.

Students and Learning

  1. Abu El-Haj, T. R. (2007). “I was born here, but my home, it’s not here”: Educating for democratic citizenship in an era of transnational migration and global conflict. Harvard Educational Review, 77(3), 285-316.
  2. Chui, W. H. & Leung, E. W. (2014). Youth in a global world: attitudes towards globalization and global citizenship among university students in Hong Kong. Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 34(1), 107-124.
  3. Coryell, J. E., Spencer, B. J., & Sehin, O. (2013). Cosmopolitan Adult Education and Global Citizenship: Perceptions From a European Itinerant Graduate-Professional Study Abroad Program. Adult Education Quarterly, 64 (2), 145-164.
  4. Dolby, N. (2005). Globalisation, identity, and nation: Australian and American undergraduates abroad. Australian Educational Researcher, 32(1), 101-118.
  5. Fernandez, O.M. (2015). Education and Planetary. Conceptions of the student participants in educational Andalusian programs. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 2015, 26, pp. 229-261
  6. Johnson, P. R., Boyer, M. A. & Brown, S. W. (2011). Vital interests: Cultivating global competence in the international studies classroom. Globalisation, Societies and Education, 9(3-4), 503-519.
  7. Maguth, B. M. (2012). Investigating student use of technology for engaged citizenship in a global age. Education Sciences, 2(2), 57-76.
  8. Marshall, H. (2005). Developing the global gaze in citizenship education: Exploring the perspectives of global education NGO workers in England. International Journal of Citizenship and Teacher Education, 1(2), 76-92.
  9. Morais, D. B. & Ogden, A. C. (2010). Initial development and validation of the global citizenship scale. Journal of Studies in International Education, 20(10), 1-22.
  10. Myers, J. P. (2008). Making sense of a globalizing world: Adolescents’ explanatory frameworks for poverty. Theory and Research in Social Education, 36(2), 95-123
  11. Myers, J. P. (2010). Exploring adolescents’ thinking about globalization in an international education program. Journal of Research in International Education, 9(2), 153-167.
  12. Myers, J. P. (2010). “To benefit the world by whatever means possible”: Adolescents’ constructions of global citizenship. British Educational Research Journal, 36(3), 483- 502.
  13. Myers, J. P., McBride, C., and Anderson, M. (2015). Beyond knowledge and skills: Discursive construction of civic identity in the world history classroom. Curriculum Inquiry, 45(2), 198-218.
  14. Myers, J. P., & Zaman, H. A. (2009). Negotiating the global and national: Immigrant and dominant culture adolescents’ vocabularies of citizenship in a transnational world. Teachers College Record, 111(11), 2589-2625.
  15. Niens, U. & Reilly, J. (2012). Education for global citizenship in a divided society? Young people’s views and experiences. Comparative Education, 48(1), 103-118.
  16. Reysen, S. & Katzarska-Miller, I. (2013). Intentional worlds and global citizenship. Journal of Global Citizenship & Equity Education, 3(1), 34-52.
  17. Rhoads, R. and Szelenyi, L. (2011). Global Citizenship and the University: Advancing Social Life and Relations in an Interdependent World. Stanford: CA, Stanford: University Press.
  18. Szelényi, K. & Rhoads, R. A. (2007). Citizenship in a global context: The perspectives of international graduate students in the United States. Comparative Education Review, 51(1), 25-47.
  19. Tormey, R. & Gleeson, J. (2012). The gendering of global citizenship: Findings from a large- scale quantitative study on global citizenship education experiences. Gender and Education, 24(6), 627-645.
  20. Wynveen, C. J., Kyle, G. T. & Tarrant, M. A. (2012). Study abroad experiences and global citizenship: Fostering proenvironmental behavior. Journal of Studies in International Education, 16(4), 334-352.

Teachers

  1. Alviar-Martin, T. (2010). Reconciling multiple conceptions of citizenship: International school teachers’ beliefs and practice. Journal of Education, 191(3), 39-49.
  2. Carr, P. R., Pluim, G. & Howard, L. (2014). Linking global citizenship education and education for democracy through social justice: What can we learn from the perspectives of teacher- education candidates? Journal of Global Citizenship & Equity Education, 4(1), 65-85.
  3. Goren, H. and Yemini, M. (2016). Global Citizenship education in context: Teacher perceptions at an international school and a local Israeli school. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education, 46 (5).
  4. Guo, L. (2014). Preparing Teachers to Educate for 21st Century Global Citizenship: Envisioning and Enacting. Journal of Global Citizenship & Equity Education, 4(1), 1-22.
  5. Hilburn, J. & Maguth, B. M. (in press). Spatial citizenship education: Civic teachers’ instructional priorities and approaches. The Journal of Social Studies Research.
  6. Larsen, M. & Faden, L. (2008). Supporting the growth of global citizenship educators. Brock Education: A Journal of General Inquiry, 17(1), 71-86.
  7. Rapoport, A. (2010). We cannot teach what we don’t know: Indiana teachers talk about global citizenship education. Education, Citizenship and Social Justice, 5(3), 179-190.
  8. Reilly, J. and Niens, U (2014). Global citizenship as education for peacebuilding in a divided society: structural and contextual constraints on the development of critical dialogic discourse in schools. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education, 44 (1), 53-76.
  9. Robbins, M., Francis, L. J. & Elliott, E. (2003). Attitudes toward education for global citizenship among trainee teachers. Research in Education, 69(1), 93-98.
  10. Schweisfurth, M. (2006). Education for global citizenship: Teacher agency and curricular structure in Ontario schools. Educational Review, 58(1), 41-50.
  11. Yamashita, H. (2006). Global citizenship education and war: The needs of teachers and learners. Educational Review, 58(1), 27-39.

Teaching Practices

  1. Banks, J. (2003). Teaching literacy for social justice and global citizenship. Language Arts, 81(1), 18-19.
  2. Battistoni, R. M., Longo, N. V., & Jayanandhan, S. R. (2009). Acting locally in a flat world: Global citizenship and the democratic practice of service-learning. Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, 13(2), 89-108.
  3. Russell, W. I., & Waters, S. (2013). “Reel” Character Education: Using Film to Promote Global Citizenship. Childhood Education, 89(5), 303-309.
  4. Camicia, S. P. & Zhu, J. (2011). Citizenship education under discourses of nationalism, globalization, and cosmopolitanism: Illustrations from China and the United States. Frontiers of Education in China, 6(4), 602-619.
  5. Gaudelli, W. & Fernekes, W. R. (2004). Teaching about global human rights for global citizenship: Action research in the social studies curriculum. Social Studies, 95(1), 16-26.
  6. Gibson, K. L., Rimmington, G. M. & Landwehr-Brown, M. (2008). Developing global awareness and responsible world citizenship with global learning. Roeper Review, 30(1), 11-23.
  7. Harshman, J. R. & Augustine, T. A. (2013, October). Fostering global citizenship education for teachers through online research. The Educational Forum, 77(4), 450-463.
  8. Heilman, E. E. (2008). Including voices from the world through global citizenship education. Social Studies and the Young Learner, 20(4), 30-32.
  9. Inbaraj, J., Kumar, S., Sambili, H. & Scott-Baumann, A. (2003). Women and citizenship in global teacher education: The Global-ITE Project. Gender & Development, 11(3), 83- 92.
  10. Tichnor-Wagner, A., Parkhouse, H., Glazier, J., & Cain, J. M. (2016). Expanding approaches to teaching for diversity and social justice in K-12 education: Fostering global citizenship across the content areas. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 24(59).
  11. Tsolidis, G. (2002). How do we teach and learn in times when the notion of “global citizenship” sounds like a cliché? Journal of Research in International Education, 1(2), 213–226.

Teaching Guides

  1. Education Above All. (2012): Education for global citizenship. Doha, Qatar: Education Above All. Retrieved from http://www.ineesite.org/uploads/files/ resources/ EAA_ Education_for_Global_Citizenship.pdf
  2. Oxfam (1997). A curriculum for global citizenship. Oxford: Oxfam Development Education Programme.
  3. Oxfam (2006). Education for global citizenship: A guide for schools. London, United Kingdom: Oxfam. Available online at http://www.oxfam.org.uk/education/gc/
  4. Young, M., & Commins, E. (2002). Global citizenship: The handbook for primary teaching. Oxford, UK: Oxfam.

Policy

  1. American Council on Education (2002). Beyond September 11: A comprehensive national policy on international education. Washington, DC: American Council on Education.
  2. Longview Foundation (2008). Teacher preparation for the global age: The imperative for change. Washington, DC: Author.
  3. NASBE Study Group (2006). Citizens for the 21st Century: Revitalizing the Civic Mission of Schools: The Report of the NASBE Study Group on Civic Engagement and Ethical Behavior in a Global Society. Alexandria, VA: National Association of State Boards of Education. http://civicmission.s3.amazonaws.com/118/c3/c/249/NASBECivic_Ed_report.pdf
  4. Partnership for 21st Century Skills (2014). Reimagining citizenship for the 21st century: A call to action for policymakers and educators. Washington, DC: Partnership for 21st Century Skills.
  5. Tawil, S. (2013). Education for ‘global citizenship’: A framework for discussion. UNESCO Education Research and Foresight, Paris. [ERF Working Papers Series, No. 7]. from http://www.unesco.org/new/fileadmin/MUL TIMEDIA/HQ/ED/pdf/PaperN7EducforGloba lCitizenship.pdf
  6. UNESCO (2013). Global citizenship education: An emerging perspective. Paris, France: UNESCO. Retrieved on May 15, 2015 from http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0022/002241/224115E.pdf
  7. UNESCO (2014). Global citizenship education: Preparing learners for the challenges of the twenty-first century. Paris, France: UNESO.
  8. UNESCO (2015). Global Citizenship Education: Topics and Learning Objectives.
  9. UNESCO (2015), Rethinking Education. Toward a global common good? Paris: UNESCO.
  10. UNESCO Bangkok Office (2014). Learning to Live Together: Education Policies and Realities in the Asia-Pacific. Paris and Bangkok: UNESCO
  11. UNESCO-UIS/ Brookings Institution (2013). Toward Universal Learning: Recommendations from the Learning Metrics Task Force. Institute for Statistics and Center for Universal Education at the Brookings Institution.